I began researching the Dworsky family in the summer of 2015 when a fellow researcher turned my attention to the Stolper Heimatkreise e.V.’s Globalindex. Feeling discouraged by my lack of findings–this was before many of the Standesamt records were indexed by the Pommerscher Greif’s Personendatenbank GreifX and six months before the Koszalin Archives uploaded their digitized […]

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The Dworsky surname in Pommern seems to have originated specifically in Wendisch Karstnitz. So far as evidence points to and despite there being some from Greifenberg in Prague in the 1600s. However, no records have been found to substantiate any other existence in Pommern. The map below shows migratory destinations in Schlawe, Stolp, and Lauenburg. […]

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There exist a number of Dawurske connections which have yet to be placed on the tree. Some of these are a result of numerous people with the same name. Others are the product of missing links due to record loss. A few are Taufpate without further information. Some of these entries may be challenging because […]

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The family of Wilhelm Dawurske immigrated to New York in 1881. Because the Dammen church records for earlier years have been lost, this family’s lineage was painstakingly reconstructed from the few scraps of history left to tell the tale. The connection to Groß Gluschen was confirmed by information found on a now-defunct German website (Gienke.net), […]

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Up until this point, the focus of this study has been predominantly fixed around the central axis of the Dworsky surname. However, in this case, it makes more sense to examine the lineage based upon one woman who married into the family: Sophia Nowcen. Curiously, she was registered as having married two men named Hans […]

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Martin Dwurske was born about 1728 and lived in house #6. He died on 09 Oct 1803 in Rambow being 75 years old. He married Sophia Charlotte Rzechen and had several children before her death. It is assumed that she died before 1789. (It’s possible she died in childbirth, though no concrete answer has been discovered in the […]

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The earliest mention of the Dworsky name in available records comes from the Blankenseesche Hufenklassifikation from 1717-1719. Here, the family is observed as farmers in Wendisch Karstnitz (also known in earlier texts as Wendisch Carstnitz or simply just Carstenitz). Martin, Michel, and Tomtz Dwuske, as it was transcribed, were Bauern in this village in Stolp […]

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The Dawurske surname is a unique variation of the Slavic name Dworsky, originating in Wendisch Karstnitz in Kreis Stolp. I have spent many years researching this surname in an effort to find a connection to my own family; all have come up empty. However, in researching this specific family, I began to notice specific trends […]

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Dear Cousins, I have been collecting family history for many years.  Until recently, most of the information that I found related to my Dad’s ancestors.  But now, in the past couple of years, I have made some breakthroughs on Mom’s side, and I’ve reached a point where it seems right to share them with you. […]

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