I wanted to take the opportunity to thank those who helped MyPomerania.com raise $65 these last two months. This is almost half of the operational expenses for a year! Your outpouring has been generous, and as the editor of this site, I appreciate the help to offset hosting costs. The plan is to continue adding […]

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At the time of writing this article, there is close to a terabyte of data on Axis History regarding digitized, available rolls of microfilm. Many of these detail World War II, including armies, panzer groups, divisions, Waffen S.S. formations, and occupational forces. Of these, the most important digitized resource that may help some is the […]

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As previously mentioned, the National Archives (NARA) in College Park, Maryland holds a great deal of information to the family researcher. After World War II, captured German records were seized and microfilmed by the United States government. The problem, however, is not accessing the information. By now, most of the information contained within these documents […]

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For the English-speaking researcher, it can often be difficult to track down just where records are stored or if they even exist. The makers of the website for Heimatkreis Neustettin have simplified this process for genealogists. This is by far the best resource I’ve been able to find referencing the Standesamt in Neustettin. It breaks […]

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People from Pomerania frequently immigrated to Rochester, New York. Consequently, there are a vast number of records that may be of use to others doing research in this area. While some of the churches listed at the following site were home to various backgrounds, one can also find places of origin. Some denote “Pommern” and […]

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The inhabitants of Kobylanka in West Pomerania/Poland (German: Kublank in the former district of Greifenhagen) are protesting against the plans of the community to dismantle the former German cemetery, which still contains many cast-iron-crosses and grave borders, exhuming the Polish dead, and changing the area to a public park. As a resting place of our […]

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There’s no question that family photos fade with time. They show signs of aging like dust, scratches, and stains. Before digital photography, memories may have been saved on film negatives or far worse: single prints. Not only do the effects of aging take a toll on the photo’s quality, having only single prints means that […]

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Unfortunately for researchers, the church records for Sageritz and several of the civil registry offices that served the parish’s villages were lost in World War II. For many, this has created an insurmountable roadblock that has been difficult to overcome. Luckily a very large number of land registers have survived. These secondary sources can be […]

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